Hi Martin, the list of VPN providers that we have highlighted in the table above are the 5 fastest paid VPN providers. PureVPN and NordVPN is amongst the list that are very much affordable, but that doesn’t mean other VPN providers are expensive. Their increased online security and increased internet speed makes other VPN providers’ price to differ.
All that being said, we currently name TorGuard as the fastest VPN service. It doesn't take the top spot in all of our tests, but has remarkably low latency and had the best performance in the all-important download tests. Fittingly, it offers many add-ons such as dedicated IP addresses that, along with its speed, will appeal to the BitTorrent users it is designed to protect.
Finally, you may want a VPN to spoof your location to download content you shouldn’t have access to, but this too has limits. A VPN used to be the go-to solution to watch U.S. Netflix overseas. That changed in 2016 when Netflix opened up to almost every country on Earth. Since then, the company has invested a lot in detecting and blocking VPN users. Even people using a VPN inside their own country will be blocked by Netflix if detected.
IPVanish is one of the very best and reliable VPN service providers with an extensive range of VPN servers in more than 60 countries. The wide range of server availability (more than 500 servers) makes their credibility stronger to be in the fastest VPN service provider list. IPVanish is also known as a Tier-1 VPN provider with all the required and advanced VPN features to offer. As a fast VPN option, it offers unlimited bandwidth that is best for all streaming lovers and other netizens. Not only this, but IPVanish has some remarkable features like KillSwitch, unlimited server switching and automatic IP-scrambler that makes a fast VPN connection. With IPVanish you can get your money back within 7 days in case you are not fully satisfied with their fast VPN connection. Here is the VPN speed test result for IPVanish:
Some VPNs offer great service or pricing but little to no insight into who exactly is handling them. We considered feedback from security experts, including the information security team at The New York Times (parent company of Wirecutter), about whether you could trust even the most appealing VPN if the company wasn’t willing to disclose who stood behind it. After careful consideration, we decided we’d rather give up other positives—like faster speeds or extra convenience features—if it meant knowing who led or owned the company providing our connections. Given the explosion of companies offering VPN services and the trivial nature of setting one up as a scam, having a public-facing leadership team—especially one with a long history of actively fighting for online privacy and security—is the most concrete way a company can build trust.
That attitude to the safety and privacy of personal data creates an enormous online security risk. Public Wi-Fi networks, which are ubiquitous and convenient, are unfortunately also highly convenient for attackers looking to compromise your personal information. How do you know, for example, that "starbucks_wifi_real" is actually the Wi-Fi network for the coffee shop? Anyone could have created that network, and they may have done so in order to lure victims into disclosing personal information over it. In fact, a popular security researcher prank is to create a network with the same name as a free, popular service and see how many devices will automatically connect because it appears safe.
×