Let's start with the basic idea of internet communication. Suppose you're at your desk and you want to access a website like ZDNet. To do this, your computer initiates a request by sending some packets. If you're in an office, those packets often travel through switches and routers on your LAN before they are transferred to the public internet through a router.
One major limitation of traditional VPNs is that they are point-to-point, and do not tend to support or connect broadcast domains. Therefore, communication, software, and networking, which are based on layer 2 and broadcast packets, such as NetBIOS used in Windows networking, may not be fully supported or work exactly as they would on a real LAN. Variants on VPN, such as Virtual Private LAN Service (VPLS), and layer 2 tunneling protocols, are designed to overcome this limitation.[citation needed]
Many of the VPN users out there are always on a quest to search for ways to speed up VPN to experience a much more smoother internet surfing experience and to minimize load time. The easiest way to increase VPN speed and make it fast is to switch to a different VPN protocol with less encryption. See, different VPN protocols have different encryption levels. The fastest VPN protocol is PPTP, which is considered best for streaming purpose. But bear in mind that it’s the most less secure VPN protocol too. But if you want a VPN with fast speeds + security, then go for L2TP VPN protocol.
To be sent on a local area network (LAN) or WAN link, the IP datagram is finally encapsulated with a header and trailer for the data-link layer technology of the outgoing physical interface. For example, when IP datagrams are sent on an Ethernet interface, the IP datagram is encapsulated with an Ethernet header and trailer. When IP datagrams are sent over a point-to-point WAN link, such as an analog phone line or ISDN, the IP datagram is encapsulated with a PPP header and trailer.
Most of the popular VPNs have dedicated apps for Windows, MacOS, iOS and Android, but VPNs can also be manually configured in various ways. Most VPNs allow a number of “simultaneous connections.” What this means is that you can run VPN apps on a number of devices at the same time using the same VPN account. We now have detailed VPN setup for all major platforms, including:
With hundreds of VPN services and clients available, it can be difficult to decide which one to use. We've extensively tested several popular VPN services that met three requirements: They had both desktop and mobile client software (with one exception), they had VPN servers in many countries, and they offered unlimited data use, at least in their paid versions.

Recall that when you're online and connected to an internet application through a VPN, there are a few things happening: Your data from your computer to the VPN service is encrypted by the VPN. Your data from the VPN service to the internet application may or may not be encrypted via https, but it's not encrypted by the VPN service. And your IP address is spoofed. The online application sees the IP address of the VPN service, not of your laptop.
More accessibility. It can be frustrating if you’ve ever traveled abroad and tried to use a website only to find that it isn’t available in that country. It can be especially frustrating if you were counting on using that site or sites for a business or educational venture. Thankfully there are ways of getting around that with a free VPN account. Our services will mask your location, giving you the freedom to explore and share content as you please, opening up more channels of communication and collaboration if desired.
VPNs also cloak your computer's actual IP address, hiding it behind the IP address of the VPN server you're connected to. IP addresses are distributed based on location, so you can estimate someone's location simply by looking at their IP address. And while IP addresses may change, it's possible to track someone across the internet by watching where the same IP address appears. Using a VPN makes it harder for advertisers (or spies, or hackers) to track you online.
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