IP / DNS Leak Test – Security is another crucial factor in my best review process since one of the main purposes of a VPN is to enhance the security of users. Some poor VPN services leak the IP or DNS of the user, which can expose their activities and identity online. It goes without saying that such VPN services are a waste of money and must be avoided at all costs.

That said, many VPN providers are based outside the US, which complicates enforcement. Jerome continued: “Users can file complaints in a local jurisdiction, and local data protection laws may have more effective enforcement mechanisms. For example, privacy and confidentiality of communications are fundamental rights in the European Union. Data protection authorities in EU-member states are empowered to handle complaints brought by individuals and then provide users with information about the outcome of any investigation. But it is unclear how effective any of these remedies will be.”
Even though Tor is free, we don’t think it’s the best option for most people. If you aren’t familiar with Tor, this handy interactive graphic shows how it protects an Internet connection, and this series goes into more detail about how Tor works. Runa Sandvik, a former researcher with The Tor Project who is now part of the information security team at The New York Times (parent company of Wirecutter), described it as “a tool that allows users to remain anonymous and uncensored.” When we asked expert Alec Muffett about whether he personally used a VPN, he told us he actually spent most of his work time using Tor. But Tor has a reputation for slow connections, can be blocked by some websites, and isn’t suitable for some peer-to-peer applications like BitTorrent.

VPN is used to hide/change your IP and encrypt your online data packets. That is the core purpose of using a VPN. But can it protect you from the online viruses that enter your system through a downloaded file, a click on a wrong link or an infected USB? It doesn’t matter if you using a slow VPN or a Fast VPN, saving your device from latest viruses is not a VPN is built for. However, antivirus software is advisable if you want to protect your device from viruses.

CyberGhost’s popular free tier might not offer amazing speeds, but its paid Pro tier is a real contender.  It proved to be both quick and consistent in our speed tests. An “extra speed” feature can be toggled before you connect for an extra boost. Setup and use are novice-friendly, and live chat with customer support is available if you need a hand. Military grade encryption ensures all your data is safely tunneled to the VPN server, and CyberGhost does not store any logs of user activity or other identifiers.
FoxyProxy is an add-on to Firefox, Chrome or Internet explorer web browsers that facilitate and streamline proxies and VPN settings. As a complementary payment service, it makes available to the user several VPN servers located in different countries. The installation and configuration of this add-on is simple, and you simply have to be attentive to add the Proxy Server that we like the most, and that does not have to be from the US.
If you're of the iPhone persuasion, there are a few other caveats to consider for a mobile VPN. Some iPhone VPN apps don't use OpenVPN, even if the VPN service that made the app supports the protocol. That's because Apple requires additional vetting if a company wants to include OpenVPN with its app. VPN app developers have slowly started jumping through those extra hoops and are bringing support for protocols such as OpenVPN to iOS.
Are you so used to your data traveling over Wi-Fi that you've stopped worrying about the security of that data—and about who else might be spying on it, or even stealing it for nefarious purposes? If so, you are—sadly—in the majority, and you ought to consider using a viritual private network, or VPN. In fact, when PCMag conducted a survey on VPN usage, we found that a dismal 71 percent of the 1,000 respondents had never used a VPN. Even among those who support net neutrality—who you might think would tend to be well informed on technology and privacy issues—only 45 percent had used a VPN.
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