A “kill switch” goes by many names, but the term describes VPN software that shuts off all network traffic in and out of your computer if the encrypted connection fails. A hiccup in your Wi-Fi or even with your ISP can cause a VPN to disconnect, and if you then maintain an unsecure connection—especially if the VPN software doesn’t alert you that it’s no longer protecting your traffic—that wipes out all the benefits of your VPN. We considered kill switches to be mandatory. And although we looked for apps that made it easy to add rules about when to activate kill switches, we considered special config files or manual firewall tweaks to be too complex. (iOS doesn’t support any kill-switch features; we address a few iOS-specific problems that apply to all VPN services in a separate section.)

So, having stated that, there are VPN protocols that are fast (implies no, or minimum encryption) and some are slow (implies stronger encryption). PPTP is a protocol which is one of the less secure but fastest protocols out there. Similarly, other protocols such as OpenVPN or L2TP/IPSec are way more secure. So, it all comes down to your own priorities. Do you want more speed or more protection? And if you want best of both worlds, we have already suggested Fast VPN providers that have all the options and protocols to get accustomed to your priorities.


Computer and software providers work hard to make sure that the devices you buy are safe right out of the box. But they don't provide everything you'll need. Antivirus software, for example, consistently outperforms the built-in protections. In the same vein, VPN software lets you use the web and Wi-Fi with confidence that your information will remain secure. It's critically important and often overlooked.
Norton WiFi Privacy is a VPN solution that is specifically designed for mobile devices. It is downloadable from the App Store or the Google Play Store. The software is capable of protecting users from the dangers associated with public Wi-Fi hotspots. It has the capability to block ads, which automatically hides advertisements while preventing sites from tracking user location.
Thankfully, there's a workaround for this problem. Instead of using the VPN app from the company from which you've purchased a subscription, you can download the standalone OpenVPN app. Open it, and you can enter your subscription information from the VPN company you've decided to work with. The OpenVPN app will then connect to the VPN company's servers using our preferred protocol.
The free account is limited to a single user, while the premium account enabled unlimited bandwidth for up to five computers or mobile devices. TunnelBear doesn’t list the total number of servers on their site, but they do offer servers in 20 countries. Their Windows and Mac OS X client is based on OpenVPN and their mobile VPN system uses L2TP/IPsec. Unlike the previous two recommendations, however, TunnelBear has a firmer stance against file sharing activities and BitTorrent is blocked. Their speeds also aren’t quite as fast as the others, so you might experience a slower connection with TunnelBear.
Windscribe, one of the best free VPNs out there, is definitely a user favorite. While its adblocker and firewall can be a little aggressive, Windscribe’s generous data allowance and commitment to privacy easily make it one of our top free picks. Not only does it allow 10 GB of data month, you get an extra 5 GB for tweeting about the service, and an extra 1 GB every time you refer a friend.
The world wide web is a massive place that allows you to connect with people from all over the world. Unfortunately, there are people out there who use valuable technology to steal information and use it for their own profit. Fortunately, we can help with our free VPN service. Don’t remain vulnerable to any potential attacks from thieves. Our services are fast, reliable, and free to use.
The problem with anonymity is there are so many issues to consider—most of which are beyond the scope of this article. Has the government surreptitiously installed malware on your PC in order to monitor your activity, for example? Does the VPN you want to use have any issues with data leakage or weak encryption that could expose your web browsing? How much information does your VPN provider log about your activity, and would that information be accessible to the government? Are you using an anonymous identity online on a PC that you never use in conjunction with your actual identity?
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VPN use, for example, allows an IBM employee to work from home in a Chicago suburb while accessing the company intranet located in a building in New York City, as if he was right there on the New York office’s network. The same technology can be used by consumers to bridge their phones and laptops to their home network so, while on the road, they can securely access files from their home computers.
Some VPNs offer great service or pricing but little to no insight into who exactly is handling them. We considered feedback from security experts, including the information security team at The New York Times (parent company of Wirecutter), about whether you could trust even the most appealing VPN if the company wasn’t willing to disclose who stood behind it. After careful consideration, we decided we’d rather give up other positives—like faster speeds or extra convenience features—if it meant knowing who led or owned the company providing our connections. Given the explosion of companies offering VPN services and the trivial nature of setting one up as a scam, having a public-facing leadership team—especially one with a long history of actively fighting for online privacy and security—is the most concrete way a company can build trust.
Trust and transparency issues are the foremost concerns in choosing a great VPN, and if a service doesn’t have enough locations to be useful to you, all the security features won’t make a difference. But after those concerns have been satisfied, we recommend that most people use connections based on the OpenVPN protocol, because of security flaws and disadvantages in the PPTP and L2TP/IPsec protocols. (Experienced users may consider IKEv2, but because it has its own debated pros and cons, we ruled it out.) Though AES 128-bit encryption is fine for most purposes, we prefer services that default to the more-secure 256-bit encryption and still offer good performance.

Buffered VPN is a Hungarian VPN provider based in Gibraltar. After operating from 2013, its services were made public in the summer of 2014. There is no broadband limit to Buffered and this is a total advantage. They have managed to bypass the limits of Netflix, BBC iPlayer and Hulu and their campaigns against the VPN, which is also impressive. Buffered becomes one of the world’s fastest VPN services with a growing network of VPN servers (currently in 29 countries, but adding more locations frequently).
Well, yes, it does. How? Because of the data encryption and server proximity. It’s always advisable to connect to a VPN server through the automatic server selection option that your VPN software has. Normally, it chooses the fastest VPN server near to you to give you better speed and a fast VPN connection. So, suppose if you have a 50 MB internet package when connected to a VPN server, you might face a little speed reduction of about 5-10 MB depending on the VPN server location and your own geographical location.
As we previously noted, we don’t recommend relying on our picks to get around geographic restrictions on copyrighted content. The practice is likely illegal, and it violates the terms of service of your ISP, VPN, and content provider. On top of that, it often doesn’t work—we couldn’t access Netflix over any of the services we tried, and of the four streams we loaded on BBC iPlayer, only two worked a few days later.
We are well aware that some of you are concerned about the prices while others want best vpn service in the world and some users want most secure encryption more than anything else. Considering these factors we mention some tips for your ease choosing the fast vpn for your use based on our through research about each vpn service and years of industry experience.

Second on our list of fast VPN protocol is L2TP. It is more similar to PPTP protocol but with added layer of encryption that makes is more powerful in terms of security. L2TP/IPSec is easy to setup and considerably delivers high-speed VPN experience from any internet-connected devices. It comes built-in to Microsoft Windows, Android, and Apple devices. However, its offering is not extended to open-source routers and consoles. L2TP/IPSec is also considered as fast secure VPN protocol as it supports 256-bit encryption packets. The use of L2TP/IPSec protocol is more in practice for commercial uses to secure all the outgoing and incoming communication. It also acts as an alternative fast VPN protocol where PPTP fail to perform due to firewalls.
If you need a more affordable VPN than our top pick and don’t have an Apple device—or if you need ChromeOS support—we recommend TorGuard. Its apps aren’t as simple or user-friendly, but TorGuard is a good option for more tech-savvy people or those willing to spend a little more time fiddling with an app. TorGuard’s CEO has built trust by talking with media outlets (including us) and detailing the company’s commitment to a service built around a lack of activity logs. Though the apps aren’t as easy to use as our top pick, the connections were the fastest of any we tested and the company has more than twice as many server locations.

Business security and strength. Businesses aren’t immune to hacking and someone getting into your system to access consumer records could be a catastrophe and lead to significant losses for everyone involved. Some businesses operate on multiple networks, potentially leaving entryways for thieves. Remote businesses are becoming the norm and employees could become targets for passage into large and secure systems. Using a VPN helps prevent such situations from happening, regardless of whether or not you’re on a public network. Your network will be encrypted, and your business will remain secure.
Oh, heck no. A VPN can help make sure you're not snooped on when connecting between your computer and a website. But the website itself is quite capable of some serious privacy violations. For example, a VPN can't protect you against a website setting a tracking cookie that will tell other websites about you. A VPN can't protect you against a website recording information about products you're interested in. A VPN can't protect you against a website that sells your email address to list brokers. Yada, yada, yada.

Corporate and Exit Locations: Depending on what you’re using a VPN for, your service’s location—and the exit locations you can choose—are important to consider. If you want to get around a location restriction and watch live TV in the UK, for example, you want to make sure your VPN service provider has servers in the UK. If you’re concerned about privacy or state-sponsored snooping, you may want to pick a service operated outside of your home country. Similarly, if the service is based on the US, they’re subject to US laws, and may be forced to turn over usage data to the authorities upon request. Many people make more of this than they should (we’ve seen overseas services turn over their data to friendly governments without any hesitation repeatedly), but it’s important to make sure a VPN has servers in multiple locations—or at least the location you’re interested in—when shopping.


Overplay is easy to install and even easier to use. Its simple user interface is suitable for those who do not want complex features. All one needs to do is run the app and choose the country you want to connect to. It offers a very good speed, with any speed reduction hardly noticeable. As the software has server locations in 48 countries and over 14,000 IP addresses, anonymity is assured.
PureVPN has servers in more than 140 countries and can be very inexpensive if you pay for two years up front. It also lets you "split-tunnel" your service so that some data is encrypted and other data isn't. But PureVPN was at or near the back of the pack in almost all of our 2017 performance tests. In October 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice disclosed in a criminal complaint that PureVPN had given the FBI customer logs in reference to a cyberstalking case, which kind of negates the entire point of using a VPN.
The service’s no logs policy means that it does not store user online activity data and promises not to release them unless required by law, ensuring that your information is in safe hands. What sets this service apart from others is its refund policy. Users are able to use it for up to 10 hours or 10GB of bandwith and still get a refund, a far more generous policy than what others have to offer.
Being in the industry for long, HideMyAss needs no introduction. It is unfair not to include them in our fastest VPN speed test, and with no surprise, they made it to the list! HideMyAss offers a wide range of servers in over 190 countries (I’m sure they will have all 196 soon) with over 930 VPN servers. Their fast VPN servers are optimized in a way to deliver top speed to cater all type of VPN needs. HIdeMyAss works on all the internet-connected devices and also offer simultaneous connectivity packed with high-speed VPN connection. HideMyAss VPN is easy to use and you don’t need any technical knowledge to operate their VPN connection. 30-day money back guarantee is also an advantage as they promise to give you money back if you are satisfied with their service. Read our complete HideMyAss VPN review here to get an in-depth understanding of the VPN provider. Here are the VPN speed results we gathered during the test:
This configuration is known as compulsory tunneling because the client is compelled to use the tunnel created by the FEP. Once the initial connection is made, all network traffic to and from the client is automatically sent through the tunnel. With compulsory tunneling, the client computer makes a single PPP connection. When a client dials into the NAS, a tunnel is created and all traffic is automatically routed through the tunnel. An FEP can be configured to tunnel all dial-up clients to a specific tunnel server. The FEP could also tunnel individual clients, based on the user name or destination.
Of course, there are more than just phones and computers in a home. Game systems, tablets, and smart home devices such as light bulbs and fridges all need to connect to the internet. Many of these things can't run VPN software on their own, nor can they be configured to connect to a VPN through their individual settings. In these cases, you may be better off configuring your router to connect with the VPN of your choice. By adding VPN protection to your router, you secure the traffic of every gadget connected to that router. And the router—and everything protected by it—uses just one of your licenses. Nearly all of the companies we have reviewed offer software for most consumer routers and even routers with preinstalled VPN software, making it even easier to add this level of protection.
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