Providers can also log less-specific data about when or how often you connect to your VPN service. In some cases, these logs are a routine part of server or account management, and can be responsibly separated and scrubbed. In other cases, VPN providers take note of every connection and use that information to actively police individual customers. Though it’s reasonable for companies to protect their networks from abuse, it becomes a dealbreaker when companies keep extensive connection data for a longer period of time. Some VPN companies we spoke with explained how a log might note your current connection for authentication purposes, but that log is deleted as soon as you disconnect. This kind of “live log” isn’t a concern, and even those culled every few hours—or as long as the end of each day—shouldn’t be confused with logs of your traffic and online destinations.
You've heard the advice before: Whether you're in the office or on the road, a VPN is one of the best ways to protect yourself on the internet. But how effective are VPNs? What's the best one for you? What are the downsides? Our executive guide aims to answer all your VPN-related questions -- including a few you probably haven't thought about before.
First I just want to say what a great website you have created, very informative. I am using Avast VPN on a Windows computer and Google Chrome browser. Without a VPN I am getting download speeds up to 180 MB, and 24 MB up, using Ookla to test speeds. Using Avast VPN drops that to 40-60 MB down and 2-3 MB up, and I have tried using multiple locations from Miami to Atlanta, NY, Chicago and Jacksonville. Miami and NY are classed as P2P. My location is S Florida. When I download torrents my speed falls drastically. With one torrent downloading I get 6 MB down and up. 2 torrents simultaneously 2.5 MB down and 1.4 MB up. 3 torrents 2 MB down and 1.5 up, and 4 torrents 1 MB down and up. I have conducted dozens of tests over the course of the day to get an average of the speeds. I had previously used Private Internet Access, which was faster at the beginning of my one year subscription, but the speeds deteriorated towards the end of that one year subscription to speeds similar to Avast’s. Do you have any suggestions for a fastest VPN for streaming and torrenting? I only download torrents once or twice a month.
Using a VPN is a little trickier for ChromeOS users, however. While Google has worked to make it easier to use a VPN with a Chromebook or Chromebox, it's not always a walk in the park. Our guide to how to set up a VPN on a Chromebook can make the task a bit easier, however. In these cases, you might find it easier to install a VPN plug-in for the Chrome browser. This will only secure some of your traffic, but it's better than nothing.

The second thing that happens is that the web application you're talking to does not get to see your IP address. Instead, it sees an IP address owned by the VPN service. This allows you some level of anonymous networking. This IP spoofing is also used to trick applications into thinking you're located in a different region, or even a different country than you really are located in. There are reasons (both illegal and legal) to do this. We'll discuss that in a bit.
When using the OpenVPN protocol, many VPN apps will give you the option of using either the TCP or UDP protocol. TCP is the protocol that you normally use to browse the web and download files. UDP is more common for streaming applications such as video, music, and gaming. The difference is in how computers and servers send network packets, the unit of data used to exchange information over the internet.

In short, it's time to start thinking about protecting your personal information. That's where virtual private networks, or VPNs, come in. These services use simple software to protect your internet connection, and they give you greater control over how you appear online, too. While you might never have heard of VPN services, they are valuable tools that you should understand and use. So who needs a VPN? The short answer is that everyone does. Even Mac users can benefit from a VPN.
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