There’s currently only one scenario where you would entertain using L2TP/IPsec instead of OpenVPN and that’s for mobile devices like iOS and Android phones. Currently neither Android nor iOS supports native OpenVPN (although there is third-party support for it). Both mobile operating systems do, however, support L2TP/Ipsec natively and, as such, it’s a useful alternative.

When we ran our recent Hive Five on VPN service providers, we heard from VPN providers begging to be included, angry CEOs who claimed their company was maliciously left out, and others accusing some of the contenders of illegal or unethical behavior. We took at look at the poll and the claims, and while there’s no definitive proof the poll was gamed, we decided to come up with our own top five, based on our own research rather than reader feedback, that are great whether you’re the privacy advocate, the student, or the downloader.
VPN is used to hide/change your IP and encrypt your online data packets. That is the core purpose of using a VPN. But can it protect you from the online viruses that enter your system through a downloaded file, a click on a wrong link or an infected USB? It doesn’t matter if you using a slow VPN or a Fast VPN, saving your device from latest viruses is not a VPN is built for. However, antivirus software is advisable if you want to protect your device from viruses.
The main drawback with ZorroVPN is that they do not offer custom VPN applications. This means you will need to use third-party VPN apps, such as Viscosity or Tunnelblick, and that setup will be more complex. Some people, however, prefer open-source applications, but regardless, they are also working on creating their own app for Windows and Linux (still in beta).
VyprVPN is one of very few providers to own and control its network infrastructure. Most VPN providers use 3rd-party companies to host their VPN servers, but not Vypr. This is a big draw for privacy concious users because their data is protected from end-to-end and never leaves VyprVPN's site. We strongly recommend avoiding its PPTP-only basic plan, but VyprVPN otherwise offers a great selection of features, such as a SmartDNS service, robust customer support and port selection. VyprVPNs “Chameleon” stealth technology is great for defeating censorship in places such such as China or Vietnam.
Everyone wants to keep their browsing activity safe and secure, but not at the expense of compromising on speed, right? This is where a fastest VPN service comes in. But why there’s a need for a fast VPN, don’t you trust your Internet provider? This WHY has multiple answers, but the best to quote here is that VPN slows down the internet, seriously? Yes, depends on the VPN you’re using. People all around the world use VPN services not only for their security but for various other entertainment purposes like streaming and downloading torrents. They look for the fastest VPN which not only keeps their browsing activity safe but also let them be the fastest on the radar.
One of today’s leading VPN providers and another worthy mention on our list of top 20 VPN services, PureVPN is known for its service quality and customer support. The service has 450 servers in 101 countries, allowing users to surf the Internet and use any online solution without having to reveal their IP address. This is very useful to those who want to bypass Internet censorship.
There’s currently only one scenario where you would entertain using L2TP/IPsec instead of OpenVPN and that’s for mobile devices like iOS and Android phones. Currently neither Android nor iOS supports native OpenVPN (although there is third-party support for it). Both mobile operating systems do, however, support L2TP/Ipsec natively and, as such, it’s a useful alternative.
Some VPNs offer “split tunneling,” which routes all traffic through your VPN except specific services or sites that you allow. For example, you might want to send your Web traffic through your VPN but stream Netflix on your fast, domestic connection. But these types of rules are complicated to implement without also leaking other important information, and we didn’t assess how effective they were in practice.

Bandwidth restrictions might not have been a big deal in the pre-streaming era, but now that everyone is streaming videos, music, and more, the bandwidth burns up really fast. Avoid VPNs that impose bandwidth restrictions unless the bandwidth restrictions are clearly very high and intended only to allow the provider to police people abusing the service.
I have a question. I subscribed to yearly plan of Vypr VPN about 6 months ago in the Chicago, US. Now, I have freshly moved to India on a job trip. My concern is that I am unable to access Netflix US with Vypr VPN. Also, the BBC iPlayer is taking too long to buffer videos. I believe Vypr is one of the fastest VPN services in industry and Golden Frog surely doesn’t compromises a bit when it comes to their standards. But, still I am left with sluggish network speed. Can you help me with it?

VPNs help enable users working at home, on the road, or at a branch office to connect in a secure fashion to a remote corporate server using the Internet. From the users perspective, the VPN is a point-to-point connection between the user's computer and a corporate server. The nature of the intermediate network, the Internet, is irrelevant to the user because it appears as if the data is being sent over a dedicated private link.
We tested each service using both the Netflix-operated Fast.com download speed test and the more comprehensive Internet Health Test; the latter measures speeds up and down through multiple interconnection points between Internet providers. We ran each test on the macOS version of each VPN software in its default configuration, with our test computer connected over Gigabit Ethernet to a cable modem with no other traffic running through it. We recorded baseline download rates without a VPN active of nearly 300 mbps, and we checked our non-VPN speeds at random intervals to ensure that our local ISP wasn’t affecting the tests.

As we already discussed in our guide of high-speed VPNs, VPN vendors use all essential privacy and security protocols to give everyone a safe-house access. However, it is subject to the protocol you use. As mentioned earlier, you need to select a right fast secure VPN protocol depending on your need. Use SSTP and OpenVPN protocols always if you are using torrent or bypassing firewalls like GFW, and NSA protocol. However, if only streaming is your concern, then switch to PPTP and L2TP protocols and get blazing fast VPN speed, with a little compromise on security. PPTP and L2TP are not unsafe, but they have low-security standards layers, that on the other hand, give you top speed for streaming.
Think about it this way: If your car pulls out of your driveway, someone can follow you and see where you are going, how long you are at your destination, and when you are coming back. They might even be able to peek inside your car and learn more about you. With a VPN service, you are essentially driving into a closed parking garage, switching to a different car, and driving out, so that no one who was originally following you knows where you went.
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