Final Verdict – VyprVPN offers reasonably good security features with its NAT firewall and AES 256 encryption. At the same time, however, it lacks in a few departments such as server size, speed, and privacy policy. It works fairly well for going over firewalls preventing users from accessing blocked websites. Nonetheless, for purposes such as streaming and torrenting, there are better alternatives available.
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IPVanish wasn't the top performer in our 2017 round of testing, falling in about the middle of the pack. But it was one of the most reliable VPN services, connecting smoothly and staying connected every time we used it. IPVanish has excellent client software, although you can connect to the company's servers manually, and a decent array of about 850 connection points in 50 countries. However, its subscription price is kind of high, and its U.S. base may be a negative for some potential customers.

Prices – ProtonVPN offers a free version with unlimited bandwidth. This makes it one of the few free VPN services with unlimited bandwidth. Its paid versions are categorized as Basic, Plus, and Visionary, each of which progressively offers more advanced features than the one before it. The basic version costs $4/month, while the Plus and Visionary plans cost $8/month and $24/month respectively. Yep, it is quite expensive.
While a VPN can protect your privacy online, you might still want to take the additional step of avoiding paying for one using a credit card, for moral or security reasons. Several VPN services now accept anonymous payment methods such Bitcoin, and some even accept retailer gift cards. Both of these transactions is about as close as you can get to paying with cash for something online. That Starbucks gift card may be better spent on secure web browsing than a mediocre-at-best latte.
In the most recent round of testing, we've also looked at how many virtual servers a given VPN company uses. A virtual server is just what it sounds like—a software-defined server running on server hardware that might have several virtual servers onboard. The thing about virtual servers is that they can be configured to appear as if they are in one country when they are actually being hosted somewhere else. That's an issue if you're especially concerned about where you web traffic is traveling. It's a bit worrisome to choose one location and discover you're actually connected somewhere else entirely.

Most VPNs won’t keep any logs of user activity. Not only is this of benefit to their customers (and a great selling point) it’s also of huge benefit to them (as detailed logging can quickly consume disk after disk worth of resources). Many of the largest VPN providers will tell you as much: not only do they have no interest in keeping logs, but given the sheer size of their operation they can’t even begin to set aside the disk space to do so.
The free account is limited to a single user, while the premium account enabled unlimited bandwidth for up to five computers or mobile devices. TunnelBear doesn’t list the total number of servers on their site, but they do offer servers in 20 countries. Their Windows and Mac OS X client is based on OpenVPN and their mobile VPN system uses L2TP/IPsec. Unlike the previous two recommendations, however, TunnelBear has a firmer stance against file sharing activities and BitTorrent is blocked. Their speeds also aren’t quite as fast as the others, so you might experience a slower connection with TunnelBear.
Google has launched Chrome on Google Daydream View and the Lenovo Mirage Solo with Daydream. If you have one of these headsets, you can launch Chrome directly from your homepage to browse and interact with any webpage while in VR. Chrome aims to be a universal browser on all types of devices and operating systems. This is also true for the new VR version. All the features you love on Chrome, from voice search to incognito mode to saved bookmarks, are now accessible on your Daydream headset.
Are you so used to your data traveling over Wi-Fi that you've stopped worrying about the security of that data—and about who else might be spying on it, or even stealing it for nefarious purposes? If so, you are—sadly—in the majority, and you ought to consider using a viritual private network, or VPN. In fact, when PCMag conducted a survey on VPN usage, we found that a dismal 71 percent of the 1,000 respondents had never used a VPN. Even among those who support net neutrality—who you might think would tend to be well informed on technology and privacy issues—only 45 percent had used a VPN.
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